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Have a Question? Contact me: ggiles@scholarcharter.org

The best way to reach me is by email. Please email me anytime with questions or concerns. If you would like to meet in person, please email and we can set up a time. I am available 3:15-4:00 pm on weekday's. 


I want to encourage team work between me and the parents of my students. My main priority is that your child succeeds and is happy while in school! I know how important your child's happiness is to you. Please keep the communication between us open and often so I can make sure that your child's needs are being met in every way possible.


Email: ggiles@scholarcharter.org


Phone: Phone: 435-566-OWLS (6957)

 

Standards and information for the week:

Reading folder: 

Early out on Friday November 15th. Students will be dismissed at 12:45.

This week the homework is called "How to Jab a Straw through a Potato." This is a nonfiction passage. We are working on technical text.

 

 

 

 

Standard information about the class:

At the beginning of every week, your child will be sent home with a Reading folder. In that folder, there will be a reading passage for the week. Along with the passage are 3 text-dependent questions per day, Monday-Thursday (12 questions per week) Also in the folder will be a "More of my Thinking" paper if they need more space to write their answers to the questions. 

 Students will receive a "My Progress" section at the bottom of their thinking paper, in their reading folder. Parents, PLEASE FILL THIS SECTION OUT TO LET ME KNOW HOW THEY ARE DOING AT HOME WITH THEIR READING. I will provide an answer key for all 12 questions so you may help them if they are struggling. Please have your child follow the directions for each day of the week and TURN IN THEIR READING FOLDER WITH THEIR QUESTIONS ANSWERED ON FRIDAY'S. They will receive a grade based on how many times they turn in their answered questions and reading folder.

There is a wealth of research supporting daily reading with your child for AT LEAST 20 minutes a day. If your child wants to read more then the passage I provide, always encourage them to do so! Our brains develop as we “feed” them with experiences. The experience of reading (whether you’re the reader or the one being read to) activates and exercises many of the areas of the brain. Because we are busy, it can be difficult to have “quality” one-on-one time. However, building at least 20 minutes into each day for reading together provides this important bonding time and helps tremendously with developing the skills your child needs to be successful. So keep up the good work!

 

 

Reading folder- At the beginning of every week, your child will be sent home with a Reading folder. In that folder, there will be a reading passage for the week. Along with the passage are 3 text-dependent questions per day, Monday-Thursday (12 questions per week) Also in the folder will be a "More of my Thinking" paper if they need more space to write their answers to the questions. 

Students will receive a "My Progress" section at the bottom of their thinking paper, in their reading folder. Parents, PLEASE FILL THIS SECTION OUT TO LET ME KNOW HOW THEY ARE DOING AT HOME WITH THEIR READING. I will provide an answer key for all 12 questions so you may help them if they are struggling. Please have your child follow the directions for each day of the week and TURN IN THEIR READING FOLDER WITH THEIR QUESTIONS ANSWERED ON FRIDAY'S. They will receive a grade based on how many times they turn in their answered questions and reading folder. There is a wealth of research supporting daily reading with your child for AT LEAST 20 minutes a day. If your child wants to read more then the passage I provide, always encourage them to do so! Our brains develop as we “feed” them with experiences. The experience of reading (whether you’re the reader or the one being read to) activates and exercises many of the areas of the brain. Because we are busy, it can be difficult to have “quality” one-on-one time. However, building at least 20 minutes into each day for reading together provides this important bonding time and helps tremendously with developing the skills your child needs to be successful. So keep up the good work

Reading folder- At the beginning of every week, your child will be sent home with a Reading folder. In that folder, there will be a reading passage for the week. Along with the passage are 3 text-dependent questions per day, Monday-Thursday (12 questions per week) Also in the folder will be a "More of my Thinking" paper if they need more space to write their answers to the questions. 

 

 There is a wealth of research supporting daily reading with your child for AT LEAST 20 minutes a day. If your child wants to read more then the passage I provide, always encourage them to do so! Our brains develop as we “feed” them with experiences. The experience of reading (whether you’re the reader or the one being read to) activates and exercises many of the areas of the brain. Because we are busy, it can be difficult to have “quality” one-on-one time. However, building at least 20 minutes into each day for reading together provides this important bonding time and helps tremedously with developing the skills your child needs to be successful. So keep up the good work!

more info

Spelling words:


  1. Spelling words

    November 11-15

  2. 1.) moist 

    2.) counted 

    3.) loud 

    4.) brown 

    5.) sprout 

    6.) proud 

    7.) flowerpot 

    8.) shouted 

    9.) found 

    10.) football 

    11.) snowstorm 

    12.) haircut 

    13.) sunglasses 

    14.) handshake 

    15.) southwest 



  3.  

 

 

Spelling Practice:

We will have spelling tests every Friday, unless it is a short week. Students will take a pre-test on Monday's to see what spelling words they need to focus on. Students will learn 15 new spelling words and 5 new challenge words each week. We will practice these words in class but students are expected to practice at home, however they choose, for 5-10 minutes Monday-Thursday. Students do not need to turn in their spelling work from home. They will be graded on their weekly spelling test. Please see the following for a variety of educational ways to practice spelling words that kids love! 

  • Create a set of flashcards. Write the spelling word in pencil on one side an index card. Trace the word in pen or marker to reinforce knowing the letters and shape the word makes when it’s spelled correctly. Read the word, turn the card over, write it again and flip to check for accuracy.

  • Create a second set of flashcards with the definition of the word on it.If possible, use a different color index card then the first set.
  • Parents, show your student the card and have them tell you the defination.
  • Use alphabet magnets or Scrabble tiles to spell out each word.
  • Use both sets of flashcards to Spelling Memory Game. Arrange the flashcards in rows, face down on the table. Each player takes a turn to pick up a two cards, one of each color. If the word and definition match, the player keeps the cards. If not, put them back in the same place and it’s the next player’s turn. The players will have to remember the position of the cards in order to match them up. When all the cards are gone, the player with the most matches wins.
  • Write the word list on a piece of paper. Then cut the words apart into strips. Then, cut those words into letters and then reconstruct the list.
  • Write sentences for each word. Parents, make sure your child is using it in context to show that they understand the definition and part of speech being used.
  • Type spelling words on the computer. This will help to reinforce how to spell each words and help recognize what the words will look like in a book or other reading material.
  • Write or type a story using all of the spelling words.
  • Alphabetize the word list. This can be done either by writing them in alphabetical order or by using the flashcards.
  • Parents, sit down with your child, two pencils and a piece of paper. Tell your child the spelling word they'll be practicing and write the first letter of the word. Pass the paper to them so they can add the next letter or next few letters. Parents add the letter after that, passing the paper back and forth, until the word is spelt.

  • Use old magazines or newspapers to find spelling words and cut them out. It can be an interesting demonstration of how many times words are used in everyday writing.

Have fun while practicing spelling! If you come up with other awesome ways to practice, feel free to give them a try and let me know how it goes! If you need more resources for practicing spelling words at home, please let me know!


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